Category Archives: Health

Trillium Raises Funds for Mental and Behavioral Health in Oregon at Annual Home Grown and Charity Golf Classic Signature Events

Guided by its mission of “Building Brighter Futures with Children and Families,” Trillium Family Services is Oregon’s leader in mental and behavioral health treatment for children and families. Children receiving care through Trillium’s programs face challenges such as depression, autism, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and other seriously debilitating conditions.  Many come from stable families seeking relief for their children; others have experienced severe abuse or trauma in significantly dysfunctional family or home environments.  Trillium uses the latest, most effective evidence-based practices that bring healing to these young people.

Each year Trillium invites the community to participate in two signature fundraising events, the proceeds from which go to support the programs and services of this vital community resource.

4th Annual Home Grown:

home grownPresented by Regence, the Trillium Family Services 4th Annual Home Grown takes place on Saturday April 11th from 6-11pm at Castaway Portland (1900 Northwest 18th Avenue, Portland, OR 97209). 

This signature event features the best of Oregon’s food and beverage industry with beer, wine, hors d’oeuvres and desserts.  Guests will enjoy a seated dinner by Art of Catering, with Music and Dancing by the popular band, Hit Machine.

Home Grown’s emcee is Chad Carter, co-creator of DadsWhoDiaper.com and the Dads Who Diaper Podcast.  Chad is a former television journalist, with a passion for mental and behavioral healthcare, and the work of Trillium Family Services.

Tickets go on sale March 1st, 2015 and can be purchased at www.TrilliumFamily.org.

14th Annual Trillium Charity Golf Classic & Awards Dinner:

jakesPresented by Jakes Famous Crawfish Restaurant , the 14th Annual Trillium Charity Golf Classic & Awards Dinner takes place on Tuesday, May 12 at Langdon Farms Golf Club (24377 Aurora Road, Aurora, OR 97002). This event includes golf, boxed lunch, catered dinner and cocktails by Jakes Famous Crawfish.

For individual or team tickets and sponsorship opportunities, contact Stephanie Warneke, Trillium Family Services Development Director, at SWarneke@TrilliumFamily.org

“Fear and shame-based approaches in HIV treatment and prevention…” Jeremiah Johnson, MPH

Published on Jul 11, 2013

In this talk, Jeremiah Johnson brings into question the role of fear and shame in the prevention and treatment of HIV. Through his personal journey with HIV, Johnson explains the stigma surrounding the disease and how he successfully changed, through advocacy, the Peace Corp’s policy enabling HIV positive people to serve. Johnson teaches us that health campaigns should be designed using positive messaging, instead of fear, to promote safe behavior and to conquer the epidemic.

Jeremiah Johnson is a recent graduate of the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health. His primary interest is in the effects of HIV-related stigma on people living with HIV and those most at risk for transmission. Diagnosed with HIV in 2008, Jeremiah has experienced consequences from stigma and discrimination firsthand. Serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer at the time of his diagnosis, the Peace Corps dismissed Jeremiah when he tested positive. With the help of the American Civil Liberties Union, he later changed Peace Corps’ policy to allow positive volunteers to continue their service. Since then, Jeremiah has continued to raise awareness around issues and policies that contribute to the spread of HIV and negatively impact the lives of those living with the virus. For two years, he worked as a case manager and prevention specialist at the Northern Colorado AIDS Project. There, he learned that there is still much work to be done to improve the quality of life for all people living with HIV. Most recently, Jeremiah completed his practicum at the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS where he worked on a nationwide study to quantify and describe HIV-related stigma and discrimination in the US.